Duckhorn Portfolio
2019 Mediterranean Wine & Golf Cruise

Ports of Call







Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon is Portugal’s capital and is the country’s largest city. It dates back some two centuries BC. While Lisbon has modern areas with long wide boulevards shaded with large trees, gardens and lavish residential areas, it also offers a wonderful old section that is built on its terraced hillsides. Lisbon is both ancient and modern and offers superb shopping and sightseeing.

This port city is home of numerous wine shops offering the best in Portuguese port and other wines, as well as some excellent Italian wines also. Women and men’s fashions are everywhere as are shoe stores and other leather products. Prices in Portugal are much lower than in France for the same products and many of the same stores that are in France have locations in Lisbon. If you are going to be clothes shopping, Lisbon is the place to do it.

A hike up to the remnants of St. George's Castle is well worth the investment of energy and time as the views of Lisbon are spectacular. If you have been to Lisbon before try heading out to the villages on the Atlantic Ocean. Sinta is especially beautiful and offers incredible beauty among its narrow and winding medieval streets.


Portimão, Portugal
The breathtaking scenery of Portugal's southernmost region has long made the Algarve region a magnet for those seeking winter sun.  And Portimão is the perfect example: golden sandy beaches beneath dramatic cliffs, the aroma of fresh sardines on the grill and some of the best golf courses in Europe - what could be better?  Visit the award-winning Museum de Portico, housed in a 19th century fish cannery - archaeology, underwater finds, and the most fascinating, a recreation of the old fish cannery.  Or tour the award-winning winery, Quinta de Penia, and taste the renowned Floral de Portimão wine. 



Gibraltar, United Kingdom
The great Rock of Gibraltar is a sight to behold.  Made of limestone, it towers 1,400 feet above the mouth of the majestic Mediterranean Sea and is surrounded by beautiful countryside and a natural reserve.  Go to the top of the Rock and admire the view across the Mediterranean and up the peninsula into Spain.  Feed peanuts to the famed Barbary Apes and visit St. Michael's Cave, a fascinating cavern once lived in by Neolithic peoples and visited by early Romans.  See the quaint fishing village along the coast and enjoy the colorful town.


Malaga, Spain

The Malaga Port is an international seaport located in the city of Malaga, Spain. It rests on the Costa del Sol coast, along the Mediterranean, in the southern portion of Spain. An interesting fact about the Malaga port of call is that it is the oldest, continuously operating port in the country and one of the oldest in the Mediterranean. The Malaga cruise terminal is in fact, a large cruising port currently, though it also serves as a center for manufactured goods transport. In addition, a small fishing fleet operates from the port itself. It is a large port, with 10 operational wharfs. Visitors may make their way into the city of Malaga by bus or taxi.

Malaga port and the city surrounding it offers visitors a range of things to do. The beaches line the coasts and make for an ideal getaway. Tourists often visit Alcazaba, a palace in the heart of the city. There are three courtyards within, including the Patio de los Surtidores with numerous fountains. The Torre de la Armadura Mudejar is an area within the building that features a 16th century carved wooden ceiling. Throughout the Malaga port, there are fantastic locations to eat, including street side vendors. In addition, stop in La Posada de Antonio, featuring outstanding seafood dishes. El Pimpi's, Clandestino and Las Papas are also idea restaurants to visit for local, traditional cuisine. For good tapas, visit Gorkis, in the center of town. For those in the old center of the city, Larious Street offers Café Chinitas, an excellent location for a drink and fast lunch that is inexpensive.




   Valencia, Spain

Spain’s third-largest city is a mixture of old and new with a magical old quarter, a futuristic City of Arts and Sciences and wide sandy beaches. 
With dynamic museums, a flourishing restaurant scene, lively nightlife, great shops and miles of beach, Valencia is bursting with Mediterranean exuberance. Influences now range from Moorish to modern, yet some things in Valencia, like a perfect pan of paella,remain thankfully unchanged.
 
If you want a taste of all Valencia has to offer - the fresh seafood, mountain herbs, field-grown grains - you've got to try the local paella. Although there are many varieties of this rice dish, the Valencian paella is usually made with only the freshest ingredients in a cast-iron pan over a wood fire. Satisfy your thirst with a taste of horchata, a popular tiger nut drink found at any of the local bars surrounding the cathedrals. Rice dishes are a sought after main course at the Malvarrosa Beach restaurants, particularly La Rosa







Palma de Mallorca, Spain
 
Palma de Mallorca, a major port city on the island of Mallorca and the capital of Spain's Balearic Islands, is a delightful cross between the Arabian Nights and the Renaissance, reflecting its checkered past of African and European control. It is the largest city on Mallorca, home to about 300,000 people -- a big, bustling place, with most of the tourist action in the old part of town around the Cathedral. The architecture of this ancient Mediterranean port blends Gothic, Moorish and Renaissance styles. Palma's winding streets make way to grand churches, yacht harbors, beaches, fountains and old castles. Because there is so much history, so close together, it's a perfect port to explore on foot. The snaky, narrow streets hold many surprises -- including the occasional dead end (beware of the passages around the Cathedral … you truly cannot get from here to there!).
 
This sun-kissed port is also an outdoors city in-season, with much pedestrian traffic and the opportunity to eat or relax outside in a myriad of settings -- some free (parks and boulevards), and some in conjunction with visits to museums and historical sites (always look for interior courtyards, extra features of older buildings). For sun worshippers, the beaches are close by and the water is wonderfully clear.


Mahon, Menorca, Spain
Mahon, or Mao, is the capital of the Spanish Island of Menorca.  It's known for it's British-style Georgian houses and sheltered harbor.  Your arrival by ship is fortuitous, as Mahon is most striking when approached by sea, perched atop a cliff overlooking the natural harbor.  Shops cluster along streets between two plazas, one large and lined with cafes and restaurants, the other tranquil, and site of the Church of Santa Maria, known for a celebrated organ with four keyboards and more than 3,000 pipes; and Carmen, a convent whose cloisters now house the municipal market. The island features many stunning beaches, all with clean, clear water, and beautiful sand.  Some are busier and more developed, others can be found in secluded coves.   



Barcelona, Spain






Barcelona is the capital of Catalonia as well as Spain’s second largest city. Dominated by Montjuic, Vallvidrera and the Tibidabo Hills, sophisticated Barcelona is rich in ancient and modern architectural and artistic treasures. Many talented artists, sculptors and architects lived here, including Picasso, Miró, Mares and Barcelona’s best-known architect, Antonio Gaudí.

Barcelona’s beginnings as a major port can be found already in Roman times. However, the most significant period was during the Middle Ages when the city's wealth equaled that of the whole Catalunya province. Splendid buildings from the Middle Ages and a unique ambiance still make Barcelona one of the most attractive cities in Europe, drawing scores of visitors to see and enjoy the sights. In addition to its medieval setting and narrow streets of the Gothic Quarter, there are magnificent avenues through the modern part of the city, which are particularly noted for their landmark buildings of Gaudí’s design.




HIGHLIGHTS

Wine Program Highlights:
  • Personally hosted by Don LaBorde, winemaker - Paraduxx
  • Private events including a welcome reception, wine tastings and winemaker's dinner featuring host wines
  • Optional Food & Wine Trails exclusive 2-night pre-cruise Lisbon program
  • Food & Wine Trails private wine-themed shore tour options  
  • $150 shipboard credit per stateroom early booking bonus
Cruise Highlights:
  • 8-night cruise aboard Azamara Club Cruises', Azamara Journey
  • Destination Immersion experience
  • Reimagined dining and entertainment experiences
  • Specialty restaurants Prime C and Aqualina
  • Optional PerryGolfTM Program

ABOUT the EXPERT(s)


Don LaBorde
Winemaker - Paraduxx

INCLUDES

  • Shipboard accommodations
  • Onboard Wine Education program
  • Complimentary AzAmazing Evenings event (most voyages)
  • Select standard spirits, international beers and wines
  • Paid shipboard gratuities
  • Bottled water, soft drinks, speciality coffees and teas
  • Self-service laundry
  • Shuttle service to and from port communities, where available

DOESN'T INCLUDE

  • Roundtrip airfare and transfers
  • Onboard specialty restaurants
  • Azamara optional shore tours
  • Food & Wine Trails optional shore tours and land programs
  • PerryGolfTM program(s)
  • Travel Insurance
  • All items of personal nature
 

REVIEWS

"Once again Duckhorn and Food & Wine Trails have helped create beautiful memories."

M. & M. Mallo (Omro, Wi)

AWARDS and RATINGS



#1 Wine of the Year 2017
95 pts. 
2014 Duckhorn Vineyards Napa Valley
Merlot Three Palms Vineyard

92 pts.
2014 Duckhorn Vineyards Napa Valley
Cabernet Sauvignon